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Guide your company’s sustainability journey

3

KEY CHALLENGES

3.1

MATERIALITY

ANALYSIS

3.2

External Reporting

3.3

Mapping Stakeholder Expectations

3.5

Human rights

3.6

Social Innovation

3.4

SUSTAINABILITY TRAINING

WHAT IS IT?

Help staff think &
work sustainably

MIA RESULTS

TRENDS

3.4

SUSTAINABILITY TRAINING

GOOD PRACTICES

WHAT IS IT?

 

We are talking about training to help employees of a company gain the knowledge and practical support they need to position sustainability/non-financial management in corporate value generation and define what that means in their daily work.

 

WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?

 

Employees need to be well-equipped to act according to the values and policies set by the organisation in which they are working. Sustainability/non-financial management is an element that needs the same approach as all learning & development areas within the company.

IDEAL SCENARIO

 

We expect a lot in this topic and asked the companies taking part in the pilot to compare their current practice to the highest level score attributed to a ‘regular function specific sustainability training for all’. This would require strong integration of general and function-specific sustainability-related modules or entire training solutions in the learning and development plan of the company.

MIA RESULTS

 

This question yielded the lowest score among the pilot companies. This may be due to relatively high expectations, however the result demonstrates how little this area is developed. Nonetheless, one could argue that equipping employees is one of the most important things to do if targets are to be achieved.

TRENDS

 

The trend we are capturing from the MIA result and conversation with companies is that sustainability / CSR trainings stay on a general awareness raising level and have still to address function-specific duties. Evolution in this integration element may and can be linked to the improvement in target-setting and employee performance management, which both came out as weaker areas of performance management (see infographic on MIA results).

 

In the workshop following the pilot assessments, we were asked whether it was reasonable to request companies to provide function-specific trainings to all, even though sustainability management does not affect all employees.

 

From an idealistic point-of-view, we would like to argue that sustainability as a management approach should be the business of everyone in the organisation. For example stakeholder relationship management, sustainability data collection, impact measurement and due diligence are transversal management skills that benefit all if sustainability management is to be well-integrated into the organisational culture and modus operandi.

RESOURCES FOR THE JOURNEY

 

In parallel to convincing your upper-management about the business case of financial/non-financial integration, i.e. integrated thinking and management, involve Human Resources in the discussion to see how to include a transversal management skill training into the learning & development plan of the company. This could also be an opportunity to address the question of sustainability targets and their integration into employee performance management.